Book Club, Curriculum

KIAT Book Club: The Differentiated Classroom Ch.2

I wrote about beginning The Differentiated Classroom a couple of weeks ago and being excited to be able to encorporate ideas from it into my own classroom.

The first chapter was an introduction to differentiation and also provided some real classroom examples of differentiation in practice, which I appreciated.

Chapter two is titled Elements of Differentiation and begins to introduce what a teacher must do in order to effectively differentiate his or her own classroom.

It discusses the importance of teaching only the essentials, especially to struggling learners, who may become confused with too many useless facts.

Also discussed is what the teacher can and should modify in the classroom and when. For example, if a student is becoming bored then something needs to be altered; the teacher can change the product outcome to suit a child’s interest or the process of learning to be driven in a different way.

Also important was the discussion of assessment and instruction. Being able to use formative assessment in order to guide our teaching practice is a hot-button topic these days, and not without reason. Assessment should be used to help the student and their learning, not to cause them anxiety or to eliminate any creativity from the teacher who has to “teach to the test”.

There was also a great figure about differentiating instruction which listed some great ways to differentiate (which I what I’m always looking for)! If you’re interested in more information about the book, here’s a link to it on Amazon.

Stay posted for chapter three!!

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Book Club, Curriculum

KIAT Book Club: The Differentiated Classroom Ch. 1

It’s been a long while since I’ve posted and I thought it only right to begin with a new book. I’ve just begun The Differentiated Classroom by Carol Ann Tomlinson (I’m obsessed with differentiation and various ways to implement it).

The book is nice and skinny with ten short chapters, so I’m excited to dive in and be able to start using the strategies right away.

Chapter one begins with a brief introduction to differentiation and the fact that it may not have necessarily been called or considered “differentiation” in the past, but effective teachers have been using the strategies for years and years.

Tomlinson then goes on to compare different classrooms at various grade levels to effectively illustrate the glaring difference between a classroom where a teacher effectively differentiates class work and one that does not.

In my classroom, I do my best to differentiate absolutely everything in all subject areas. Of course, this is not always easy to do as it requires a huge initial time commitment to set everything up.

Thankfully, over time it becomes easier to create new assignments and tasks which are differentiated for every student.

I’m hopeful that this book will provide me with more ways to differentiate and ideas for implementation in my own classroom. If you’re interested in purchasing the book, here’s a link for it on Amazon.

Stay posted for chapter two!